LIFE STYLE

Monthly Archives: MARCH 2017


Leggings and yoga pants: When tight trousers get controversial
27.03.17 - Vicky Baker*
Leggings and yoga pants: When tight trousers get controversial



A social media storm erupted on Sunday when two girls were stopped from boarding a United Airlines flight because they were wearing leggings.

The girls were flying as guests of employees, and thus were subject to the company's dress code.

But it is not the first time leggings or yoga pants have caused controversy in the United States.

Both types of tight-fitting trousers, which have become increasingly popular leisure wear, have become the topic of hot debate in recent years.

For many, they are simply a comfy alternative to jeans.

For others, their form-hugging material makes them overly revealing or even obscene.

Last October, a man in the US state of Rhode Island sent a letter to his local newspaper, calling for women over 20 to stop wearing them.

"Like the mini-skirt, yoga pants can be adorable on children and young women who have the benefit of nature's blessing of youth. However, on mature, adult women there is something bizarre and disturbing about the appearance they make in public," wrote Alan Sorrentino.

It sparked a "yoga pants protest". Hundreds of women of all ages responded by walking through the town of Barrington wearing leggings.
Jamie Bee, one of the protest's organisers, told that the outrage was never really about yoga pants.

"For me and many others, it's the principle," she said. "Why do people feel the need to tell others how to dress?"

Mr Sorrentino, who said he received threats after the backlash, later said his letter was meant as satire.

But across the world, some women are fighting back against restrictions on what they can wear, from burkinis to comfortable footwear.

Stretching the rules

United Airlines has since clarified that regular passengers are not subject to the same leggings ban as the girls on Sunday's flight.

But the dress code, which applies to staff and their relatives travelling on special passes, states a ban on "form-fitting lycra/spandex tops, pants and dresses", among various other restrictions.

Flight attendant and author Heather Poole said, on Twitter, that airlines often have dress codes for staff travelling for free, as they are seen as representing the company.

"Men have a dress code too. This is about being too 'casual'. We can't wear flip flops or shorts either," she wrote.

'Cover your buttocks'

Various US schools have also attracted controversy with their policy on leggings.

In Ohio, the Lakewood city school district revised its dress code last year following complaints that it had outdated and sexist elements.

Tight-fitting trousers, including leggings and yoga pants, went from being banned to permitted, but only if "the garment worn on top covers the buttocks".
 
 

Other amendments to the code included allowing hooded sweatshirts, as long as the hoods are not covering a student's head. They also upped the minimum length of skirts from "slightly above the knee or longer" to "mid-thigh or longer."

In 2015, students at Cape Cod Technical College in Massachusetts planned a protest against dress code changes that prohibited them from wearing yoga pants and similar clothing without wearing a skirt, dress or shorts over the top.

School superintendent Robert Sanborn argued that the policy was designed to prepare students for the working world.

"Part of our framework for our school is employability skills, and there's proper dress for that," he told the Boston Globe at the time.

The school did not back down and the dress code still stands.

The sheer cheek of it

In some cases, the argument has boiled down to whether or not the clothing is new. Threadbare leggings can be much more revealing.

In 2013, a sports-clothing company, had to recall many of its leggings because they were considered too sheer.
 
(*Courtesy: BBC.com)




[home] 1-3 of 3


Comment

your name*

email address*

comments*
You may use these HTML tags:<p> <u> <i> <b> <strong> <del> <code> <hr> <em> <ul> <li> <ol> <span> <div>

verification code*
 



Big Place in a Small Space.
17.03.17 - harcharan bains
Big Place in a Small Space.



THE EQUIVALENT OF 20 MILLION VOLUMES WORTH OF INFORMATION IS INSIDE THE HEAD OF EVERYONE OF US. THE BRAIN IS A VERY BIG PLACE IN A VERY SMALL SPACE
 
The life we experience is but memory and dreams connected with the filter we call present . The filter records memory and creates dreams and then makes sense of them in a moment that we call awareness...That awareness perhaps lasts one trillionth of a second , and each one of hese three trillion parts flow in a wave-particle pattern just like that of light. The one/trillionth moment that our brain is able to transmit into consciousness is life. Therefore, in a way, our lives are nothing but these tiny trillionth parts of each second joined together on a string and constantly flashing as a evolving chain of bulbs.
 
This is how I interpret the knowledge I have of life's choreography.
 
Carl Sagan puts it far more beautiful and factually thus:
 
"What we know is encoded in cells called neurons , tiny switching elements, every connection representing one bit of information..How many neurons each one of us has? May be 100 billion. comparable to the number of stars we have in the Milky Way galaxy. And there are something like 100 trillion neural connections. This intricate and marvellous network of neurons has been called an enchanted loom where millions of flashing shuttles weave a dissolving pattern.
 
Even in sleep, brain is pulsing and throbbing and flashing with the complex business of human life - dreaming, remembering, figuring things out. Our thoughts, our visions , our fantasies have a tangible physical reality. What does a thought look like ? Its made of hundreds of electro-chemical impulses. All orchestras play inside our heads . The information content of the human brain if written out in bits is about a hundred trillion bits .If written out in English, it would fill 20 million volumes The equivalent of 20 million volumes worth of information is inside the heads of everyone of us. The brain is a very big place in a very small space."




[home] 1-3 of 3


Comment

your name*

email address*

comments*
You may use these HTML tags:<p> <u> <i> <b> <strong> <del> <code> <hr> <em> <ul> <li> <ol> <span> <div>

verification code*
 



Woman's face burned after her headphone batteries exploded mid-flight
15.03.17 -
Woman's face burned after her headphone batteries exploded mid-flight



A woman has singed hair and a blackened face after her battery-operated headphones exploded mid-flight from Beijing to Melbourne.
 
The Australian woman had been sleeping on the plane on 19 February when she heard a loud explosion about two hours into the flight and felt her face burning.
 
She threw her headphones to the floor.

"As I went to turn around I felt burning on my face," she told the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) which investigated the incident.

"I just grabbed my face which caused the headphones to go around my neck. I continued to feel burning so I grabbed them off and threw them on the floor."

"They were sparking and had small amounts of fire."

Flight attendants rushed to help and poured a bucket of water on the headphones, but the battery and its cover were both melted and stuck to the floor.

Pictures show the woman, who was not named, with a blackened face and neck and blisters on her hands, with passengers having to endure the smell of melted plastic, burnt electronics and burnt hair for the remainder of the flight.

"People were coughing and choking the entire way home," the woman added.

The transport safety bureau, which did not identify which airline was involved, assessed that the lithium-ion batteries in the device likely caught fire.

"As the range of products using batteries grows, the potential for in-flight issues increases," it said, reminding travellers using battery-powered devices they must be kept in an approved stowage unless in use.

Spare batteries should be kept in carry-on luggage, it added.

Many airlines last year barred all Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones over fire risk concerns, following reports of exploding batteries.




[home] 1-3 of 3


Comment

your name*

email address*

comments*
You may use these HTML tags:<p> <u> <i> <b> <strong> <del> <code> <hr> <em> <ul> <li> <ol> <span> <div>

verification code*
 







MOST VISITED
YOU MAY LIKE

TOPIC CLOUD

TAGS CLOUD

ARCHIVE



Copyright © 2016-2017







NEWS LETTER