ENTERTAINMENT

Monthly Archives: APRIL 2016


Baaghi : Film review
29.04.16 - Uday Bhatia*
Baaghi : Film review



When Baaghi’s trailers arrived in March, everyone was surprised to note similarities between it and the 2012 Indonesian film The Raid: Redemption. After all, Indian action cinema is known for its striking originality and, in those rare cases where inspiration is found elsewhere, its scrupulousness in acknowledging sources. So what if both films involve a high-rise with trained killers on every floor and a martial arts expert fighting his way up? The Raid was a distillation of brutal movement and impact. Baaghi has songs and dances and a love story. Entirely different films.

In the end, the surprise isn’t how blatantly The Raid is copied, but the surprising effectiveness of those scenes. They only make up around 20 minutes of a 150-minute film and while they cannot match the sustained ferocity of Gareth Evans’ sequences, they have a respect for spatial geography and a tendency to show blows and kicks delivered (rather than cutting at the moment of impact), which is rare for Indian action cinema. Tiger Shroff is competent at best as a lover, a comic and a dramatic actor, but he’s quite a sight when he’s fighting onscreen. The scenes with him kicking and punching his way to the top of the building are gritty fun despite being completely derivative. But to see these, you have to sit through the rest of the film, which is hardly fair.

In short, then: rebellious Ronny (Shroff) and film actor Siya (Shraddha Kapoor) meet on a train bound for Kerala. They banter (not very intelligently) and begin to fall in love. He joins a kalaripayattu academy run by Guruswamy (Shaurya Bhardwaj), whose son, Raghav (Sudheer Babu), also falls for Siya. No sooner has Ronny become a martial arts pro than Raghav kidnaps Siya and whisks her off to Bangkok (director Sabbir Khan has said that his inspiration was the Ramayana, not The Raid). Two hours later, having endured Kapoor’s aren’t-I-just-precious routine, Babu’s very good impression of a block of wood with a smirk painted on it and a mute child who isn’t mute enough, we reach the high-rise.

It’s a quick jog to the end from there on, and the best stretch of the film. It’s nice to see an Indian film sling a few convincing action scenes together, yet it’s also depressing to think that we’d probably never have been able to work out such sequences if there hadn’t been a ready template. But then, that’s what we do best: imitate a superior product and package it as rebellion.
 
(Courtesy : *Livemint.com)




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Dilip Kumar 'fine now', may be discharged from hospital on Tuesday
18.04.16 - pt team
Dilip Kumar 'fine now', may be discharged from hospital on Tuesday



Veteran actor Dilip Kumar, who was admitted to Lilavati hospital on Saturday morning for treatment of high fever and nausea, is likely to be discharged on Tuesday.
 
Saira Banu's manager Murshid Khan told IANS: "Dilip sir is fine now and all his reports are also normal. Once doctors give a heads up, he will probably be discharged by tomorrow."
 
The veteran actor suffered high fever and vomiting on Saturday morning following which he was rushed to Lilavati hospital.
 
Dilip Kumar was last seen in the film Qila in 1998. He was awarded the Dadasaheb Phalke Award in 1994 and the Padma Vibhushan in 2015. The legendary actor, whose real name is Mohammad Yusuf Khan, acted in films like Madhumati, Devdas, Mughal-e-Azam, Ganga Jamuna, Ram Aur Shyam and Karma during his six-decade long career.
 
On Monday morning, superstar Amitabh Bachchan took to Twitter to share the news that Dilip saab was on the mend.
 
The Piku star posted the news after having a word with the actor's wife Saira Banu about his health.
 
"Saira ji informs me that he (Dilip Kumar) is doing fine, by the grace of the Almighty... Prayers for a speedy recovery," Bachchan tweeted on Sunday.




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Sachin to make his acting debut; Film on his rise to cricket stardom
15.04.16 - pt team
Sachin to make his acting debut; Film on his rise to cricket stardom



Sports biopics like Bhaag Milka Bhaag and Mary Kom have a proven track record of success at the Bollywood box office, so it was only a matter of time before someone bought the rights to the life story of Indian cricket god, Sachin Tendulkar.
 
Directed by British director James Ersekine and produced by Mumbai-based 200NotOut Productions, Sachin charts Tendulkar's rise from "wild child" to "virtuous hero" who "united his country". The film boasts music by A.R. Rahman.

What's more, Sachin Tendulkar will be making his acting debut in his biopic, reports India Today.

Have a look at the film's teaser below:
 




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Victorias to vanish from Mumbai roads
15.04.16 - Shashank Bengali
Victorias to vanish from Mumbai roads



Nothing seems to faze 15-year-old Amol as he marches through the pell-mell streets of Mumbai's historic district: not the pedestrians darting through traffic as if on a dare, not the car horns constantly blaring behind him, not even a derelict red bus that zooms past him at an intersection, nearly knocking him down.
 
Amol is a horse. For more than a decade, he has towed a carriage through the heart of the city, whisking tourists and lovers past the landmark hotels and crumbling Art Deco facades of old Mumbai.
 
White-skinned and flaxen-haired — if a bit weary looking — Amol keeps a steady pace in the late afternoon heat amid streams of motorcyclists and black-and-yellow taxis. As the carriage driver, Anees Shaikh, unleashes a stream of tobacco spit off to one side, Amol pulls to a stop at a red light next to a bus full of tourists. 
 
A blond woman sitting in the window points her cellphone camera at Amol and his shiny carriage, encased in aluminum and festooned with artificial flowers, the front molded into the shape of a swan.
 
"Everyone loves to see the carriages," Shaikh says over the din of car horns, which Mumbai drivers employ even when waiting at a signal. "Whether or not they go for a ride, the horses make them happy."
 
The carriages are a quaint, nostalgia-inducing and sometimes maddening presence in the city's bursting core. Like those near Manhattan's Central Park, they share the streets with cars, contributing to rush-hour jams and occasionally making questionable turns.
 
Yet for decades they have been a symbol of Mumbai, immortalized in Bollywood romances and etched in the popular imagination as a relic of British colonial days.
 
Soon, Amol will lead his last joy ride around historic Mumbai. The city's high court last year ordered all carriages off the roads by June, citing the growing safety risks to horses and humans. Animal rights groups had argued the horses were overworked, underfed, suffered bone ailments from plying the tar streets and sometimes sustained injuries in the heavy traffic.
 
Yes, Shaikh acknowledges, he has been in accidents. Horses have been struck by cars and the metal carriages have been damaged. Mumbai's streets are immeasurably more chaotic than they were in the late 19th century, when India's British rulers brought the first carriages to the city then known as Bombay.
 
The carriages came to be known as Victorias, after the queen. During World War II, Australian soldiers passing through the city would take the reins of the Victorias and race one another through the streets, according to "Taj Mahal Foxtrot," journalist Naresh Fernandes' history of the city in the Jazz Age.
 
After India won independence in 1947, the carriages remained, but as the decades passed and the city grew, they were confined to an ever smaller area. The last 100 or so licensed carriages are restricted to a few downtown blocks.
 
The light turns green and Amol starts moving again, clip-clopping past a statue of Mahatma Gandhi and then, harrowingly, making a right turn against traffic in front of an elegant red-brick courthouse. Oncoming drivers slow to a stop and Amol's pace picks up as he eases into a quiet lane lined with flowering trees.
 
Shaikh's father and grandfather were carriage drivers. As a boy, he tended to the horses at their stables, in the city's rundown former red-light district, before starting to drive at age 15. He rejects the contention that the animals are treated poorly.
 
Now in his 30s, he is unsure what he will do after the carriages disappear from the roads.
 
"One carriage feeds at least five families," Shaikh says. "The horses may go to another state and be put to work, but where will we go?"
 
Amol stops half a block from the Taj Mahal hotel, the elegant red-brick icon overlooking the sea. Several other horses stand at the roadside, munching on buckets of carrots. One driver stares at his reflection in the aluminum, twirling his mustache.
 
Shilpa Patel, who is visiting from out of town with her parents and two children, descends from a carriage bedecked with faux marigolds.
 
"Just like in the movies," Patel says. "It kind of reminds us of the old days, how our parents traveled."
 
As Shaikh parks, three pudgy boys appear and begin haggling with him in Arabic. Shaikh, who learned bits of Arabic from ferrying around Saudi tourists, haggles back and the boys go away.
 
The ride is over. Shaikh takes his fee for the 15-minute trip, about $7.50. He touches the bill to his chest, to the horse's knee and then to his head, murmuring a small prayer. Stuffing the bill into his pocket, he glances up the road and into the twilight sky, looking for Amol's next passenger.
 
Courtesy : Los Angeles Times




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Deepika is confused between Ranveer Singh and Ranbir Kapoor
10.04.16 - pt team
Deepika is confused between Ranveer Singh and Ranbir Kapoor



The Bollywood stars Ranveer Singh, Deepika Padukone and Ranbir Kapoor are quite popular not just for their works but their personal lives too have become talk of the town. Whether it is Ranveer Singh, Deepika Padukone or Ranbir Kapoor and Deepika Padukone – the gossip mongers could go non-stop about them. Deepika’s chemistry with her alleged beau Ranveer and former lover Ranbir was always the talk of the town. Now it looks like Deepika Padukone will have to make a tough call between Ranveer and Ranbir.
 
There’s buzz stating that Deepika Padukone has been offered two projects. One is with her alleged beau Ranveer Singh and the other one is with her former boyfriend Ranbir Kapoor, reports Mid Day. And due to the leggy lass’ busy schedule, she will be going forward with just one project. Now which project to choose is something that the actress needs to decide.
 
The report further states that Deepika Padukone and Ranbir Kapoor met in order to discuss about this upcoming project. But the actress’ spokesperson had denied such rumours stating that she does not discuss about the projects that she is been approached for, reports India Today. It also mentioned that the both are big banner projects and Deepika has loved both the scripts. 

Ranveer Singh, Deepika Padukone or Ranbir Kapoor have not confirmed about such buzz that’s going on. Last year Deepika was paired opposite Ranveer in ‘Bajirao Mastani’ and opposite Ranbir in ‘Tamasha’. We are sure the beauty will be able to make the right decision like always! Deepika will soon be seen in the Hollywood movie ‘xXx: The Return of Xander Cage’ opposite Vin Diesel.




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