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Monthly Archives: APRIL 2020


VIRUS MADE IN CHINA LAB?
Did Prof Honjo call you? Well, he finally called. Listen to him.
28.04.20 - kanwar manjit singh
Did Prof Honjo call you? Well, he finally called. Listen to him.



NOBEL PRIZE did not do as much for Professor Tasuku Honjo, but finally fake news helped. Overnight, the 2018 co-winner of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine became a household name in India, with everybody and his uncle and nephew quoting Prof Honjo to buttress the kitchen-made theory of vector science: China made the Covid-19 virus in a lab to launch a biological/virological warfare against America and the rest of the west.

It took mere hours for fact-finders and saner websites to do some basic investigation and cross checking to find out that it was a hoax. But in a country whose prime minister wants 'Ab Ki Baar - Trump Sarkar', who cares for useless pursuits like fact-finding?

China-haters and "true saffron sons" of Bharat Mata joined forces with die-hard Reds, leading a storm on the social media against Beijing, the destroyer of modern civilisation, aviation, business, oil markets and your favourite street corner shop called Aggarwal Sweets.

On WhatsApp and Facebook, Prof Honjo was pitted against China by corona warriors armed with a China-made smart phone and a cheap data connection. Ferocious than the Qing Dynasty's conquest of the Ming dynasty and bloodier than the Taiping Rebellion, the battle claimed all sanity.

When Punjab Today pointed out the fact-finding and underlined that Prof Honjo has not made any such claim, it received a lot of hate mail. "How do you know? Has Prof Honjo told you?" one caller asked. He did not say if Prof Honjo called him.

Leading newspapers published the fake story on their front pages and sane men based their entire theory on Prof Honjo's fake claims to blame China for coronavirus.
 
In Punjab, Jagbani newspaper put the fake news on its front page, and otherwise sanehead Bir Devinder Singh theorised an entire geo-strategic game of thrones scenario based on the same fake story.

Compared to the US President's prime time television recommendation of drinking disinfectant, this fake Prof Honjo expose was perhaps not as dangerous, but it has laid bare the faultlines in Punjab's intellectual mindscape.

And nothing could convince these warriors because Prof Honjo had not called them personally on their private number to inform that he has never been to the Wuhan lab, that he has never investigated the origin of virus, and that he has never made the claims attributed to him.

It did not occur to shoot-from-the-hip China-busters that Nobel Prize winner scientists normally do not deduce that scores of scientists working in a lab must have died because they are not picking up their phones. (Fact Check: A doctor pronounces a person dead. Not a telecom service provider.)

Now, Professor Tasuku Honjo has taken the trouble, finally. It might break the hearts of our brave men and women, but here is what the professor, who has a Nobel Prize in his drawer to establish his credentials, said about his claimed link to social media posts which bragged that the SARS-CoV-2 virus was ‘man-made’ or ‘invented’ in a laboratory.
 
"In the wake of the pain, economic loss, and unprecedented global suffering caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, I am greatly saddened that my name and that of Kyoto University have been used to spread false accusations and misinformation,” Honjo said in a statement released by Kyoto University on Tuesday, April 28.
 
According to asianscientist.com report, while comparative analysis of genomic data has shown evidence that SARS-CoV-2 is not a laboratory construct or a purposefully manipulated virus, the notion that the SARS-CoV-2 virus was invented has continued to receive mileage on social media platforms.
 
"At this stage, when all of our energies are needed to treat the ill, prevent the further spread of sorrow, and plan for a new beginning, the broadcasting of unsubstantiated claims regarding the origins of the disease is dangerously distracting,” Honjo said.
 
Honjo is currently the deputy director-general and a distinguished professor at the Institute for Advanced Study at Kyoto University, Japan. In 1992, Honjo discovered programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), a key player in tumor immunology. He showed that PD-1, a protein expressed on the surface of a subset of immune cells known as T-cells, functions as a brake on T-cell function, and that blocking PD-1 would help to restore T-cell targeting of cancer cells.
 
The Japanese immunologist’s findings paved the way for the use of PD-1 inhibitors as cancer treatment in human patients. Clinical development ensued, and in 2012 a key study demonstrated clear efficacy in the treatment of patients with different types of cancer, with patients experiencing long-term remission.
 
In a 2016 interview with Asian Scientist Magazine, Honjo said his personal philosophy was to show "curiosity, courage and challenge” in his research pursuits. Two years later, Honjo was honored with the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine for his discovery of PD-1 and its significance to cancer immunotherapy.
 
"This is a time for all of us, especially those of us devoting our careers to the forefronts of scientific research, to work together to fight this common enemy. We cannot delay one moment in this effort to save the lives of our fellow humans,” Honjo urged.
 
But will Prof Honjo's clarification be enough to stop our WhatsApp corona warriors from firing new posts in the direction of the Wuhan lab? That is like imagining that stuff like science can stop us from being stupid. Why do you think bottles of disinfectants have a warning on the label, screaming, "DO NOT DRINK." It is because they know that a Trump can become a president. You can drink ‘kahda’, of course. May be, that’s science. May be. Ask Prof Honjo. Did he call you?
 
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Disclaimer : PunjabToday.in and other platforms of the Punjab Today group strive to include views and opinions from across the entire spectrum, but by no means do we agree with everything we publish. Our efforts and editorial choices consistently underscore our authors' right to the freedom of speech. However, it should be clear to all readers that individual authors are responsible for the information, ideas or opinions in their articles, and very often, these do not reflect the views of PunjabToday.in or other platforms of the group. Punjab Today does not assume any responsibility or liability for the views of authors whose work appears here.

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_______________________________________________________________

Punjab Today believes in serious, engaging, narrative journalism at a time when mainstream media houses seem to have given up on long-form writing and news television has blurred or altogether erased the lines between news and slapstick entertainment. We at Punjab Today believe that readers such as yourself appreciate cerebral journalism, and would like you to hold us against the best international industry standards. Brickbats are welcome even more than bouquets, though an occasional pat on the back is always encouraging. Good journalism can be a lifeline in these uncertain times worldwide. You can support us in myriad ways. To begin with, by spreading word about us and forwarding this reportage. Stay engaged.

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No need of lament for the Indo-Pak media
25.04.20 - Markandey Katju
No need of lament for the Indo-Pak media



Mediapersons in the Indian subcontinent are crying hoarse and are weeping and wailing over the curbs on media freedom and gagging of press freedom in both India and Pakistan.
 
In India many complain that they dare not question the government lest they lose their jobs and/or are booked for sedition and on other charges, as indeed many have been.
 
In Pakistan they lament over the arrest and long detention of Mir Shakilur Rehman, owner of the Jang group of publications, and harrassment of mediapersons.
 
But is their lament justified? I submit it is not, and I wish to give my reasons.

To understand the role which the media should be playing in India and Pakistan we have to first understand the historical context.

Our subcontinent is presently passing through a transitional period in its history, transition from feudal agricultural society to modern industrial society.

This is a very painful and agonizing period in history. The old feudal society is being uprooted and torn apart, but the new, modern, industrial society has not yet been created. Old values are crumbling, everything is in turmoil. We may recollect the line in Shakespeare’s play Macbeth: "Fair is foul and foul is fair”. What was regarded good earlier, e.g. the caste system, is regarded bad today (at least by the enlightened section of society), and what was regarded bad earlier, e.g. love marriage, is acceptable today (at least to the modern minded persons).

One is reminded of Firaq Gorakhpuri’s Urdu couplet:

"Har zarre par ek kaifiyat-e-neemshabi hai
Ai saaqi-e- dauraan yeh gunahon ki ghadi hai”

In a marvel of condensation this sher (couplet) reflects the transitional age. Zarra means particle, kaifiyat means condition, e means of, neem means half, and shab means night. So the first line in the couplet literally means

"Every particle is in a condition of half night”.

Urdu poetry is often to be understood figuratively, not literally. So this line really means that (in the transitional age) everything is in flux, neither night nor day, neither the old order nor the new. Also, in the middle of the night if we get up we are dazed, in a state of mental confusion, and so are people in a transitional age.

In the second line, saaqi is the girl who fills the wine cup, but she is also the person to whom one can confide one's innermost thoughts. The poet is imagining a woman, to whom he is describing the features of the transitional era. ‘Yeh gunahon ki ghadi hai’, i.e. it is the time of sin. In this transitional age it is a ‘gunahon ki ghadi’ from both points of view.
 
From the point of view of people of the old, feudal order it is a sin to marry according to your choice, and particularly outside one’s caste or religion, it is a sin to give education to women, it is a sin to treat everyone as equal. At the same time, from the point of view of modern minded people the caste system is a sin, denying education to girls is a sin, love marriage is acceptable, and equality is a basic value. Thus old and new ideas are clashing with each other in the transitional age.

It is the duty of all patriotic people, including the media, to help our society get over this transition period quickly and with less pain. The media has a very important role to play in this transition period, as it deals with ideas, not commodities. So by its very nature the media cannot be like an ordinary business,but must give leadership to the people in the realm of ideas.


If we study the history of Europe when it was passing through its transition period, i.e. from the 16th to the 19th Centuries, we find that this was a terrible period in Europe, full of turbulence, turmoil, revolutions, wars, chaos, social churning and intellectual ferment. It was only after passing through this fire that modern society emerged in Europe. The Indian subcontinent is presently going through this fire. We are passing through a very painful and turbulent period in our history.

Historically, the print media emerged in Europe as an organ of the people against feudal oppression. At that time the established organs of power were all in the hands of the feudal despotic authorities (the king, aristocrats, etc). Hence the people had to create new organs which could represent them. That is why the print media became known as the fourth estate. In Europe and America it represented the voice of the future, as contrasted to the established feudal organs which wanted to preserve the status quo. The media thus played an important role in transforming feudal Europe to modern Europe. The print media was at that time not in the form of regular newspapers or journals but often as pamphlets, leaflets etc which were used to attack feudal ideas and practices.

In the Age of Enlightenment in Europe the print media represented the voice of reason. Voltaire attacked religious bigotry and superstitions, and Rousseau attacked feudal despotism. Diderot said that "Man will be free when the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest”. Thomas Paine proclaimed the Rights of Man, and Junius (whose real name we still do not know) attacked the despotic George III and his ministers (see Will Durant’s ‘The Story of Civilization: Rousseau and Revolution’). Louis XVI, while in the Temple prison saw books by Voltaire and Rousseau in the prison library and said that these two persons have destroyed France. In fact what they had destroyed was not France but the feudal order.
 
In the 19th Century the famous writer Emile Zola in his article ‘J’ Accuse’ accused the French Government of falsely imprisoning Captain Dreyfus in Devil’s Island only because he was a Jew.

In my opinion the Indian and Pakistani media should be playing a role similar to the progressive role played by the media in Europe during the transitional period in Europe. In other words, our media should not just report news, but also give leadership to the people in the realm of ideas, and help our countries get over the transition period and became a modern industrial state. This it can do by attacking backward, feudal ideas and practices e.g. casteism, communalism and superstitions, and promoting modern scientific and rational ideas. But is it doing so?

In my opinion a large section of our media (particularly the electronic media) does not serve the interest of the people, in fact some of it is positively anti-people.


There are three major defects in our media which I would like to highlight.

1. Our media often diverts the attention of the people from the real issues to non issues. The real issues in the Indian subcontinent are socio-economic,  i.e. the terrible poverty in which 80% of our people are living, the massive unemployment, appalling level of child malnourishment, the price rise, lack of proper medical care and good education for the masses, backward social practices like honour killing and caste oppression, religious discrimination and  atrocities on minorities, rampant corruption,  etc.
 
Instead of devoting most of its coverage to these real issues our media usually focuses on triviliaties and non issues like lives of film stars, petty politics,  fashion parades, pop music, disco dancing, astrology, cricket, reality shows, etc.

There can be no objection to the media providing some entertainment to the people, provided this is not overdone. But if 90% of its coverage is related to entertainment, and only 10% to the real issues facing the nation (mentioned above) then there is something seriously wrong with the media. The whole question is of proportion. In the our media the sense of proportion has gone haywire. Entertainment gets 10 times the coverage that unemployment, malnourishment,  health, education , labour, agriculture and environment together get. Does a hungry or unemployed man want entertainment or food and a job?

Many TV channels show cricket day in and day out. Cricket is really the opium of the Indian masses. The Roman Emperors used to say "If you cannot give the people bread give them circuses”. This is precisely the approach of the Indian establishment, duly supported by our media. Keep the people involved in cricket so that they forget their social and economic plight. What is important is not poverty or unemployment or price rise or farmers suicides or lack of housing or healthcare or education, what is important is whether India has beaten New Zealand (or better still Pakistan) in a cricket match, or whether Virat Kohli has scored a century.

Enormous space is given by our media to business, and very little to social sectors like health and education. Most media correspondents attend the film stars, fashion parades, pop music, etc. and very few attend to the lives and problems of workers, farmers, students, sex workers, etc.

Some years back a Lakme Fashion week in Mumbai was covered by 512 accredited journalists. In that fashion week women were displaying cotton garments, while the men and women who grew that cotton were killing themselves an hour’s flight from Nagpur in the Vidarbha region. Nobody told that story except one or two journalists locally.
 

The Indian media coverage of the education field concentrates (if at all) on the elite colleges like the I.I.Ts, but there is very little coverage of the plight of the tens of thousands of primary schools, particularly in rural areas where education begins.

In Europe the displaced peasants got jobs in the factories which were coming up because of the Industrial Revolution. In India, an the other hand industrial jobs are now hard to come by. Many mills have closed down and have become real estate. The job trend in manufacturing has seen a sharp decline.
 
Of late the auto sector in India (which is regarded as an indicator of the health of the economy) saw a decline in sales of about 40%. TISCO employed 85,000 workers in 1991 in its steel plant which then manufactured 1 million tons of steel. In 2005 it manufactured 5 million tons of steel but with only 44,000 workers. In mid 90s Bajaj was producing 1 million two wheelers with 24,000 workers. By 2004 it was producing 2.4 million units with 10,500 workers.

Where then do these millions of displaced peasants go? They go to cities where they became domestic servants, street hawkers, beggars, or even criminals. It is estimated that there are 1 to 2 lac adolescent girls from Jharkhand working as maids in Delhi. Prostitution is rampant in all cities, due to abject poverty. 12 million youth are entering the job market in India every year, but jobs have become less due to the economic recession.

In the field of health care, it may be pointed out that the number of quacks in every city in India is several times the number of regular doctors. This is because the poor people cannot afford going to a regular doctor. In rural areas the condition is worse. The government doctors posted to primary health centres usually come for a day or two each month, and run their private nursing homes in the cities the rest of the time.

In ‘Shining India', the child malnutrition figures are the worst in the world. According to UNICEF data and Global Hunger Index, the percentage of under weight children below the age of 5 years in the poorest countries in the world is 25 per cent in Guinea Bissau, 27 per cent in Sierra Leone, 38 per cent in Ethiopia, and 48 per cent in India. One third of all malnourished children in the world are Indian children.The average family in India is consuming 100 kilograms of food grains less than it did 10 years ago (see P. Sainath’s article ‘Slumdogs and Millionaires’).

All this is largely ignored by our media which turns a Nelson’s eye to the harsh economic realities facing upto 80 per cent of our people, and instead concentrates on some Potempkin villages where all is glamour and show biz. Our media is largely like Queen Marie Antoinette, who when told that the people have no bread, said that they could eat cake ( see my article ' Why celebrate Republic Day when the Constitution has become a scarecrow ' online )..

2. In India many TV channels have been blatantly and shamelessly promoting communal hatred, and thus serving the interest of the ruling party which thrives on this.
 
Of late many Indian TV channels have stigmatised the Tablighi Jamaat Markaz in Delhi for allegedly spreading corona virus, and its head Maulana Saad has been painted as the devil, though it is ridiculous to say that he or the Tablighi Jamaat were deliberately spreading the disease.The subtle message being sent by showing this is that all Indian Muslims are spreaders of corona, and in this way the entire Muslim community in India is demonized, and many are being boycotted and harassed in various ways ( see my article ' Bad days are ahead for Indian Muslims ' published in nayadaur.tv ).

India is a country of great diversity, and about 200-250 million of its 1350 million people are Muslims. Hence it is absolutely essential if we wish to keep united and prosper that there must be tolerance and equal respect to all communities living in India. Those who sow seeds of religious discord among our people are really enemies of our people, and the truth is that a large section of  our media, has become abettors of this national crime.

3. The media promotes superstitions

As I have already mentioned, in this transitional age, the media should not just report news but should also help our people to move forward into the modern, scientific age. For this purpose the media should propagate rational and scientific ideas, but instead of doing so a large section of our media propagates superstitions of various kinds.

It is true that the intellectual level of the vast majority of Indians is very low, they are steeped in casteism, communalism, and superstitions. The question, however, is whether the media should try to lift up the intellectual level of our people by propagating rational and scientific ideas, or whether it should descend to that low level and seek to perpetuate it?

In Europe during the Age of Enlightenment the media (which was only the print medium at that time) sought to uplift the mental level of the people and change their mindset by propagating ideas of liberty, equality and fraternity and rational thinking. Voltaire attacked superstitions, Rousseau attacked the feudal system, and Dickens criticized the horrible conditions in jails, schools, orphanages, courts, etc. Should not our media be doing the same?

At one time courageous people like Raja Ram Mohan Roy wrote against Sati, child marriage, purdah system etc. (in his newspaper ‘Miratul Akhbar’ and ‘Sambad Kaumudi’). Nikhil Chakraborty wrote about the horrors of the Bengal Famine of 1943. Munshi Premchand and Sharat Chandra Chattopadhyaya wrote against feudal practices and women’s oppression. Manto wrote about the horrors of Partition.


But what do we see in our media today?

Many T.V. channels show astrology. Astrology is not to be confused with astronomy. While astronomy is a science, astrology is pure superstition and humbug. Even a little common sense can tell us that there is no rational connection between the movements of the stars and planets, and whether a person will die at the age of 50 years or 80 years, or whether he will be a doctor or engineer or lawyer. No doubt most people in our country believe in astrology, but that is because their mental level is very low. The media should try to bring up that level, rather than to descend to it and perpetuate it.

Many channels mention and show the place where a Hindu god was born, where he lived, etc. Is this is not spreading superstitions.

I am not saying that there are no good journalists at all in the media.
 
There are many excellent journalists. P. Sainath is one of them, whose name should be written in letters of gold in the history of Indian journalism. Had it not been for his highlighting of the farmers suicides in certain states the story (which was suppressed for several years) may never have been told.
 
There are others too like Ravish Kumar of NDTV (winner of the Magsaysay award), Siddhartha Varadarajan, who publishes the portal thewire.in, Karan Thapar, etc. But such good journalists are few and far between. The majority consists of people who do not seem to have the desire to serve the public interest, but have shamelessly become sycophants of the rulers.

To those who complain of suppression of media freedom my reply is this: freedom cannot be an end in itself, it can only be a means to an end, and that end must be to secure the people better lives. If media freedom serves that end it deserves to be supported, but not otherwise. Should there be freedom to the media to spread communal or caste hatred?
Should it have freedom to divert attention of the people from real issues to trivialities and non issues ? Should it have freedom to spread superstitions? Certainly not.

There is no freedom which is absolute. All freedoms are subject to reasonable restrictions, and are also coupled with responsibilities. In a democracy everyone is accountable to the people, and so is the media. The media must serve the people in getting better and decent lives. Unfortunately the media in our subcontinent is not doing that, and is often doing just  the contrary. So I cannot lament over its suppression. What was it doing when it was relatively 'free'?

To sum up: our media must now introspect and develop a sense of responsibility and maturity, and start serving our people.. Until it does that, there is no use complaining of suppression of media freedom
 
 
Justice Markandey Katju is former Judge, Supreme Court of India and former Chairman, Press Council of India.
 
 
 
  
Watch video: 

Disclaimer : PunjabToday.in and other platforms of the Punjab Today group strive to include views and opinions from across the entire spectrum, but by no means do we agree with everything we publish. Our efforts and editorial choices consistently underscore our authors' right to the freedom of speech. However, it should be clear to all readers that individual authors are responsible for the information, ideas or opinions in their articles, and very often, these do not reflect the views of PunjabToday.in or other platforms of the group. Punjab Today does not assume any responsibility or liability for the views of authors whose work appears here.

_______________________________________________________________

Most shared Punjab Today articles:

 

KYUN KE HUM HAIN HINDUSTANI

Three Women of 1984

 FROM 1984 TO BARGARI - Hurt & angry, we’ve tried rage, anger. Did we miss karuna?   

REVISITING 1984 – RIOT AROUND A POLE     

KARTARPUR SAHIB: A CLARION CALL FOR PEACE IN AN AGE OF CYNICISM

If it could happen to Arun Shourie, imagine what could they do to you?

Healers & Predators – The Doctor is In, & is very corrupt

Amarinder, Badals, AAP — Every party in Punjab is now an Akali Dal

Welcome to 1947. Happy Independence Day. Would you like to step out?

In Pakistan, a donkey pays for democracy – bleeding, its nostrils ripped apart

WOOING THE PANTH: Amarinder a little less Congressy, Akali Dal a little more saffron

"Captain Amarinder Singh ji” and "Rahul”: Reading Sign Language In A Relationship

The Comrade In Punjab - Lost, Irrelevant, Asleep, Even Bored!

WATERS ROYALTY - The Loot that Rajasthan Committed

AMARINDER GOVT's LOVE FOR FARMERS, AND MY DAD's FOR HIS SCOOTER

OF SUNNY KID & HORSE SENSE: The Punjab-Punjab Ties  

TRUDEAU VISIT AND RIGHT-WING MEDIA MACHINE         

 OF NIRMAL SINGH'S EYES 

Mr. CHIEF MINISTER, PLEASE CALL OFF JANUARY 7 FUNCTION         

MR PRESIDENT, PLEASE TAKE BACK HIS GALLANTRY MEDAL       

A SAFFRON JOURNEY VIA CANADA

BAD, BAD WOMAN!

 


 

_______________________________________________________________

Punjab Today believes in serious, engaging, narrative journalism at a time when mainstream media houses seem to have given up on long-form writing and news television has blurred or altogether erased the lines between news and slapstick entertainment. We at Punjab Today believe that readers such as yourself appreciate cerebral journalism, and would like you to hold us against the best international industry standards. Brickbats are welcome even more than bouquets, though an occasional pat on the back is always encouraging. Good journalism can be a lifeline in these uncertain times worldwide. You can support us in myriad ways. To begin with, by spreading word about us and forwarding this reportage. Stay engaged.

— Team PT





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CENSORSHIP
Hindustan Times censored his column; Ramchandra Guha decides to stop writing for them altogether
19.04.20 - Team PT
Hindustan Times censored his column; Ramchandra Guha decides to stop writing for them altogether



Historian Ramachandra Guha on Sunday said in a tweet that he would no longer be writing his fortnightly column in the Hindustan Times, explaining that the newspaper had decided not to publish his article about the Central government’s Central Vista project to reconstruct an iconic section of New Delhi.

"For print and online readers of my regular ‘Past and Present’ column in The Hindustan Times –for this Sunday’s issue I had written on the folly and vanity of the Central Vista project,” Guha said in a tweet. "The newspaper has censored the column.”

The Rs 20,000-crore Centra Vista project seeks to demolish and rebuild several historic buildings in a four-square-km area from the gates of Rashtrapati Bhawan to India Gate. On March 20, the day after Narendra Modi announced a people’s curfew to stop the spread of the coronavirus pandemic, the Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs issued a notification amending the land use of five plots to allow the project to proceed.

Many have pointed out that the money could be put to better use to fight the pandemic.

In a separate tweet, Guha said the editors that he worked with were "happy to publish the piece” but had been overruled by the management. "I was given the option of junking this piece and continuing the column. I have chosen to stop writing for them altogether,” he added.

For print and online readers of my regular "Past and Present" column in the Hindustan Times—for this Sunday's issue I had written on the folly and vanity of the Central Vista project. The newspaper has censored the column. The piece will soon appear in another (and braver) forum.

The editors I worked with at the Hindustan Times were happy to publish this piece. They were overruled by their bosses and by the management. I was given the option of junking this piece and continuing the column. I have chosen to stop writing for them altogether. 

As per Scroll report, the five plots in the Central Vista plan include a site where a new parliament house is proposed to be constructed adjacent to the existing building, and another plot on which a new residence for the new prime minister is to come up.
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Watch video:
 

 

Disclaimer : PunjabToday.in and other platforms of the Punjab Today group strive to include views and opinions from across the entire spectrum, but by no means do we agree with everything we publish. Our efforts and editorial choices consistently underscore our authors' right to the freedom of speech. However, it should be clear to all readers that individual authors are responsible for the information, ideas or opinions in their articles, and very often, these do not reflect the views of PunjabToday.in or other platforms of the group. Punjab Today does not assume any responsibility or liability for the views of authors whose work appears here.

_______________________________________________________________

Most shared Punjab Today articles:

 

Amarinder govt’s nefarious plan to steal Shamlat Lands will spell death knell of Punjab

KYUN KE HUM HAIN HINDUSTANI

Three Women of 1984

 FROM 1984 TO BARGARI - Hurt & angry, we’ve tried rage, anger. Did we miss karuna?   

REVISITING 1984 – RIOT AROUND A POLE     

KARTARPUR SAHIB: A CLARION CALL FOR PEACE IN AN AGE OF CYNICISM

If it could happen to Arun Shourie, imagine what could they do to you?

Healers & Predators – The Doctor is In, & is very corrupt

Amarinder, Badals, AAP — Every party in Punjab is now an Akali Dal

Welcome to 1947. Happy Independence Day. Would you like to step out?

In Pakistan, a donkey pays for democracy – bleeding, its nostrils ripped apart

WOOING THE PANTH: Amarinder a little less Congressy, Akali Dal a little more saffron

"Captain Amarinder Singh ji” and "Rahul”: Reading Sign Language In A Relationship

The Comrade In Punjab - Lost, Irrelevant, Asleep, Even Bored!

WATERS ROYALTY - The Loot that Rajasthan Committed

AMARINDER GOVT's LOVE FOR FARMERS, AND MY DAD's FOR HIS SCOOTER

OF SUNNY KID & HORSE SENSE: The Punjab-Punjab Ties  

TRUDEAU VISIT AND RIGHT-WING MEDIA MACHINE         

 OF NIRMAL SINGH'S EYES 

Mr. CHIEF MINISTER, PLEASE CALL OFF JANUARY 7 FUNCTION         

MR PRESIDENT, PLEASE TAKE BACK HIS GALLANTRY MEDAL       

A SAFFRON JOURNEY VIA CANADA

BAD, BAD WOMAN!

 


 

_______________________________________________________________

Punjab Today believes in serious, engaging, narrative journalism at a time when mainstream media houses seem to have given up on long-form writing and news television has blurred or altogether erased the lines between news and slapstick entertainment. We at Punjab Today believe that readers such as yourself appreciate cerebral journalism, and would like you to hold us against the best international industry standards. Brickbats are welcome even more than bouquets, though an occasional pat on the back is always encouraging. Good journalism can be a lifeline in these uncertain times worldwide. You can support us in myriad ways. To begin with, by spreading word about us and forwarding this reportage. Stay engaged.

— Team PT








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